aprnew99 Schwerdtfeger Library News
April 1999

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 1998-99 UNIVERSITY LIBRARY COMMITTEE
http://www.library.wisc.edu/libraries/News/ULC/reports/index.htm

The University Library Committee devoted the 1998-1999 academic year to
studying trends in the production, acquisition and dissemination of
information by libraries essential to the continued excellence of the
UW-Madison as a world class university.

Findings include:
1)  urging the Faculty Senate and the University Committee to support the
ongoing efforts of libraries and campus administrators to maintain the
concepts of fair use and public domain in an electronic age,
2)  UW-Madison faculty members who are editors of journals published by
commercial houses should challenge the exorbitant increases in library
subscription rates for those journals and explore other publishing
capabilities,
3)  UW libraries should continue their cooperative agreements with other
universities in  licensing of electronic databases and journals,
4)  libraries should expand their use of e-mail to inform faculty, staff
and students of new library resources,
5)  UW libraries should provide on their home pages a description of
current collection management practices.

The report is not too lengthy and worth the read.
 

ALA, GSA  AND Y2K

The American Library Association is joining with the United States General
Services Administration (GSA) to announce a new federal Web site for local
communities to use in educating the public about Y2K and its possible impact.

The "Community Guide to Y2K" Web site can be found at
http://www.itpolicy.gsa.gov/mks/yr2000/community/community.htm.

Designed around the basic needs of daily life, the site provides
information on the current status of Y2K preparations as well as guidance
for individuals and communities in how to prepare for
possible problems related to Y2K.

Libraries have been strongly encouraged to join in announcing the site to
their users, local community groups and organizations.  A downloadable
flyer announcing the site's URL can be found at
http://www.itpolicy.gsa.gov/mks/yr2000/community/download.htm.

For additional information or assistance, send an e-mail message to
y2k.web@gsa.gov.
 

AMS JOURNALS ONLINE
http://ams.allenpress.com/cgi-bin/omisapi.dll/ams?request=frames&link=all-jour

We now have access to all of the American Meteorological Society (AMS)
journals online starting with *January 1997*.
 

ELECTRONIC JOURNALS
http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/library/ejour.htm

We've created our own list of electronic journals because the path to
finding them is not always apparent.   It includes titles from the
atmospheric sciences, physics, chemistry, engineering -- titles that tend
to be heavily used by researchers at SSEC.   If there are any others that
are full-text that you feel should be included, please let us know.
 

WEEKEND NEWSSTAND
http://www.wpt.org/weekend/newsstand/index.html

This site was announced on Wisconsin Public Radio.  It's a nice collection
of state newspapers -- "your one-stop Internet gateway to fresh information
from around Wisconsin."
 
 

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST

A NEW ANTARCTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATABASE
http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk.lib/spriant.htm

There is Internet availability of SPRILIB Antarctica, a subset of the Scott
Polar Research Institute bibliographic database SPRILIB containing 33,000
records covering the period 1602 to 1996.  This database is intended to
complement rather than duplicate the COLD REGIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY in that it
provides comprehensive coverage of Antarctic literature through to 1862,
and after that includes almost all books and reports.  After 1962, the COLD
REGIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY  is more comprehensive for journal articles and
conference papers.  For books, SPRILIB Antarctica is likely to be more
comprehensive for all periods.

This database has a very interesting and easy to use interface, allowing
searching by keyword, author, time period, geographic region, or
expedition.  It also has an extremely interesting method of allowing you to
refine your search by offering you a choice of key words the system has
chosen for particular relevance to your search. [NSF Library Newsletter,
3/11/99]
 

DISTRIBUTED INFORMATION AND COMPUTATION IN SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING
ENVIRONMENTS, D-Lib Magazine, v.5, no.4, April 1999.
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april99/04abrams.html

The NSF Invitational Workshop on distributed Information, Computation, and
Process Management for Scientific and Engineering Environments (DICPM)
brought together domain specialists from engineering and the ocean,
atmospheric, and space sciences involved in the development and use of
simulations of complex systems, and computer scientists working on
distributed repositories, visualization, and resource management.  The
objective was to formulate directions for research efforts to facilitate
effective collaboration and to help increase access to information and
sharing of results and tools useful in large-scale, distributed,
multidisciplinary scientific and engineering environments.
 

INTERNET CURRENT AWARENESS
http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OL1999/net3.html

This is a good article on tracking Web page changes -- services that
provide current awareness for monitoring changes in specific Internet
information resources, from Web pages to news sites to Usenet news.   [NSF
Library Newsletter, 4/22/99]
 

WORLD STANDARDS SERVICES NETWORK (WSSN)
http://www.wssn.net/WSSN

A network of publicly accessible World Wide Web servers of standards
organizations around the world.  Through the Web sites of its members, WSSN
provides information on international, regional and national
standardization and related activities and services. [From the site summary]
 

NEW NSF REPORTS

The National Science Foundation (NSF) periodically releases statistical
reports on the status and trends of US Science  All reports are available
in HTML and/or .pdf formats and may be downloaded at the URLs provided.

Annotated List of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC)
- March 1999
http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf99334
SESTAT:  A Tool for Studying Scientists and Engineers in the United States
http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf99337
NSB Preliminary Report, 25-26 March 1999 Meeting
http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsb9963
NSB Preliminary Report, 17-18 February 1999 Meeting
http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsb9929
 

A VISUAL INTERPRETATION OF THE TABLE OF ELEMENTS -- chemsoc [.pdf]
http://www.chemsoc.org/viselements/

Provided by chemsoc, the chemistry societies network, this new site offers
an attractive and informative visual interpretation of the periodic table.
Blending the work of artists and chemists, the site features
computer-generated interpretive images, descriptions and histories, and a
link to a data sheet in .pdf format, for each of the 109 elements.  The
site's contributors have also collaborated to produce Periodic Landscapes,
computer-generated models based on various patterns and relationships
within the periodic table.  These graceful and other-worldly images will be
accompanied by interpretive material and annotated animations.  Additional
resources include a history of the periodic table and a selection of
desktop patterns and screen savers (Windows NT/95/98).  [Copyright Internet
Scout Project, 1994-1999]
 

NATIONAL SCIENCE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION
http://www.NSTA.org/

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) was founded in 1944, and
it is the largest organization in the world committed to promoting
excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all.

NSTA provides many programs and services for science educators, including
awards, professional development workshops, and educational tours.  The
NSTA website has links to state, national, and international science
education organizations, an on-line catalog of
publications, and two "discussion rooms" to foster interaction and ongoing
conversations about science education.
 

THE ENGINES OF OUR INGENUITY
http://www.uh.edu/engines/

Written and hosted by John Lienhard, produced by KUHF-FM, Houston, and
distributed by National Public Radio, "The Engines of Our Ingenuity" is a
short radio program that explores the role of human creativity in the
formation of our material and intellectual culture.  The topics covered
range broadly, "from cable cars to civil War submarines, from the
connection between Romantic poets and Victorian science to the invention of
the bar code."  Broadcast five days a week since 1988, the show has
produced over 1,400 episodes, and users may read transcripts of every one
at this site.  Browseable by number and title or searchable by keyword, the
short transcripts may also include images and links to related sites.
[Copyright Internet Scout Project, 1994-1999]