maynew00 Schwerdtfeger Library News
April-May 2000

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

FUNDING NEWS

The Board of the Friends of the UW-Madison Libraries has voted to award a small grant to the Schwerdtfeger Library for preservation/conservation of Wilson Bentley's snowflake lantern slides.  I am excited not only about their preservation but making them more accessible to our users.

Since 1997 when the Friends began awarding small grants through this competition, they've given nearly $75,000 in direct grants to library units located throughout the campus.
 

SCHWERDTFEGER LIBRARY SERVICES 

In response to some of your questions, I've created a sampling of the kinds of services the Schwerdtfeger Library provides and the range of queries to which we respond.
 

ELECTRONIC JOURNALS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC AND SPACE SCIENCES

We continue to add new titles to the Schwerdtfeger Library's list of full-text, electronic journals as they become available.  We make every effort to provide you with the most direct link.  You'll also find a link to the Campus-wide list of e-journals.
 

WISCONSIN WEATHER: MADISON-AREA FOCUS Current (updates vary)

This is a new resource.  Wisconsin Weather is a compilation of academic and government meteorological and climatological sites related to weather events in Wisconsin, particularly the Madison area. The topics include: current conditions, forecasts, severe weather, radar and satellite images, climate summaries, and tropical information. It also lists statewide and worldwide resources. The site is intended to provide quick and easy navigation to weather and climate information.
 

JOURNAL CITATION REPORTS

The JCR is the only comprehensive source of citation data on journals, and includes virtually all specialties in the areas of science, technology, and the social sciences.  It is published by the Institute for Scientific Information which also brings you the Web of Science (Science Citation Index).  There are two editions available. The Science Edition contains data from roughly 5,000 journals in the areas of science and technology. The Social Sciences Edition contains data from roughly 1,500 journals in the social sciences. There is no citation report for the Arts and Humanities.

The beauty of JCR is that it allows you to compare journals from a specific subject area, rank the journals by total number of times cited (most frequently used/highest impact journals), or rank by the average age of cited articles, compare how often articles published in a journal are cited in the same year or measure the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.   You can look at groups of journals, individual journals, journals by a specific publisher or by country.

This resource is licensed for access by UW-Madison students, faculty, staff.  You may have to log in more than once as the number of simultaneous users is limited.  Data are available for 1998 and 1997.  Additional years will be added.
 

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST

INTERNET RESOURCES:  PHYSICS

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), a division of the American Library Association, puts out monthly lists of key resources on the Internet.  The list for March 2000 amounts to a solid, annotated metapage of physics links.  Categories for sites include:  general physics metasites, professional societies, laboratories, preprint sites, reference sources, electronic journals, educational resources, people in physics and discussion groups.   [NSF Library Newsletter, 4/12/00]
 

SLAC SPIRES HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS DATABASE

Search more than 415,000 high-energy physics related articles, including journal papers, preprints, e-prints, technical reports, conference papers and theses, received by the SLAC and/or DESY libraries since 1974. You can enter a SPIRES find command, perform a simple search, or browse the indexes.
 

TOP CITED HEP ARTICLES

Lists of the most cited articles in High-Energy Physics (HEP) with summation reviews, provided as a service by the SLAC Library.  The 1999 edition covers all HEP papers from January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999.
 

HURRICANE SEASON

Hurricane season officially started June 1st -- here are some useful websites:

Tropical Cyclones (CIMSS)
NOAA Miami Regional Library
Climate Prediction Center
NCDC
 

SPACE SCIENCE MISSIONS -- NASA

From NASA's Office of Space Science, this metapage lists a wide variety of missions that are either under study, in development, currently in operation, or completed (those that ended after 1989).  Users may access names of missions, brief descriptions, and links to missions by clicking on the category heading.  Also available here are a few links to multi-mission programs, ground-based astronomy, technology programs, and non-space science missions.  [From the Scout Report for Science & Engineering, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2000]
 

NRC REPORT ON ASTRONOMY RESEARCH

A new report from the National Research Council of the National Academies maps out the priorities for investments in astronomy research over the next decade.  This report will factor into funding decisions, both here and at the National Science Foundation, for years to come.  [Space Science News from NASA HQ, 5/23/00]
 

MARS IMAGES
Press release
Images

More than 20,000 new images of the planet Mars taken by Mars Global Surveyor are now available in a web-based photo album.  [Space Science News from NASA HQ, 5/23/00]
 

JPL MISSION AND SPACECRAFT LIBRARY

A public source for information about spacecraft. All kinds of spacecraft. Big spacecraft, and small spacecraft. American, Soviet, Japanese, Indian, Chinese, and Luxembourgian spacecraft. Research, communications, astronomy, navigation, and spy satellites.  The purpose of the library is to provide a general overview of these space missions to the average reader, not just those fluent in aerospace geek speak.
 

SPACE POLICY PROJECT

From the Federation of American Scientists, "The Space Policy Project promotes American national security and international stability by providing the public and decision-makers with information and analysis on civil and military space issues, policies and programs."  Subjects include Russian Aerospace, Challenger Accident, Life on Mars, and Advanced Aircraft. Each subject is exhaustively researched, and often provides annotated links to other Web resources. In addition space weapons are monitored, as are military and civil uses of space, and a country guide to space exploration and use.  Searchable. [Librarians Index to the Internet, 4/24/00]
 

THE BOOK'S IN PRINT, BUT ITS BIBLIOGRAPHY LIVES IN CYBERSPACE
(New York Times, Sunday, 29 May 2000)

Oxford University Press recently decided to publish its print version of, "The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero," by Robert Kaplan **without** its 78-page bibliography.  Instead the bibliography (and notes) has been published on OPU's Web site:  http://www.oup-usa.org/sc/0195128427/index.html. This raises some interesting questions about what happens when a book and its supporting source material are split.
 

THE LAST BOOK:  THE FUTURE OF WORDS

A fascinating three-part series in the Washington Post on the future of books and reading!
 

GOOGLE GOES INTERNATIONAL

Google has added even more functionality in the form of a multiple language search service. Currently available for Beta testing, this new feature allows users to search and receive returns in ten additional languages: French, German, Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Norwegian, and Danish. GoogleScout and cache functions are available in multi-language searches, though links to related categories in the Google Directory are not. Search returns and rankings will vary considerably based on the selected language.  [From the Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project, 1994-2000]
 

METAEUREKA (JavaScript)
http://www.metaeureka.com/

Yet another in a large collection of metasearch engines, METAEUREKA distinguishes itself by its no-nonsense format -- no graphics, ads, or anything really except the search box and your results. It also includes a very useful feature for users concerned with the "freshness" of their search returns. Clicking on the Site Info link under each result produces a small pop-up window which lists, among other things, the last time the site was modified. METAEUREKA is keyword-searchable; indexes AltaVista, Google, Lycos, Alltheweb, and Yahoo, offering ten or twenty results per engine; and lists the results on a single page. A refreshing, clean, and simple alternative to the recent spate of cluttered, all-inclusive portal/ metasearch engines. [From the Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project, 1994-2999]
 

IXQUICK METASEARCH

Branding itself "the world's most powerful metasearch engine," Ixquick also features a clean and simple interface. Ixquick indexes fourteen search engines and directories, though users can pick and choose between them if they desire. The real appeal of Ixquick, however, is its "star rating" system for reporting results. While some metasearch engines might be fooled by irrelevant entries at the top of one or more of the engines indexed, Ixquick assigns a star for each time a listing appears in the top ten of the engines indexed. Thus, a result that appears anywhere in the top ten of numerous engines will always be ranked higher than one that sits at the top of just one or two. Ixquick also offers metasearches of selected news, .mp3, and image resources. European language support (German, Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese) is provided.
[From the Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project, 1994-2000]
 

COPYRIGHT LAW OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Circular 92 of the Copyright Office entitled, "Copyright Law of the United States of America" has been updated through April 2000.   The preface lists amendments made to the Copyright Law since 1976, the last major revision.

"The Constitutional Provision Respecting Copyright:   The Congress shall have Power ... To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries."  (United States Constitution, Article I, Section 8)
 

TWO DINOSAUR SITES
Fighting Dinosaurs -- AMNH [QuickTime, IPIX]
Sue at the Field Museum

These two sites will appeal to dinosaur lovers of all ages. The first comes from the American Museum of Natural History and serves as a companion to a new exhibit highlighting recent discoveries from Mongolia, including one of the most famous finds ever: a_Velociraptor_ that was apparently buried alive by a sand flow while attacking a _Protoceratops_. The site features animated recreations of the last moments of these dinosaurs and their fossilized remains, as well as a modest image gallery of some of the other specimens from Mongolia, some of them yet to be named. Beginning Monday May 22, a virtual tour of the exhibit (IPIX plug-in required) will be available. The second site highlights another famous fossil that was very much in the news this week: Sue, the most complete and best preserved _T. Rex_ skeleton ever found. Discovered in South Dakota in 1990, Sue was purchased by the Chicago Field Museum in 1997 and went on display this week. At the site, visitors can learn about Sue and her history, how the skeleton was prepared for display, some quick facts, a FAQ, and an image gallery. [From the Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project, 1994-2000]