Library News - April 2008
SSEC Employee News: April 2008
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Library News

By Jean Phillips

 

Reading the Weather

In 1887, the Honorable Ralph Abercromby, in his book, Weather, gives this visual description of tornadoes:

"the general appearance of the cloud over a tornado or whirlwind is always described as peculiarly smoky, or like the fumes of a burning haystack. The tornado is also never an isolated phenomenon;  it is always associated with rain and electrical disturbance." (p269)

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of National Library Week (13-19 April 2008), Linda Hedges designed a new exhibit exploring the state of the art of meteorology texts a century ago. Responding to readers' inquiries, the editor of Monthly Weather Review compiled a list of popular works on meteorology for the April 1895 issue. We have scanned sample pages from seven of these texts which are available in campus libraries, including our own.

Stop by the library and see how atmospheric scientists were viewing our world then.

 

What's New with Intellectual Property?
by Jean Phillips and Dan Bull

Last fall, the Max Planck Institute canceled its license to journals published by Springer; a headline that garnered lots of attention. Commercial publishers like Elsevier and Springer have had monopolies on the scientific publishing market, allowing them to continue to increase subscription and license fees because they have had a captive library audience and at the same time, controlling all copyright to the works..

The traditional scholorly publishing model works like this: scientist A pays to have his/her paper published in a journal; then library B from the authors institution, pays so that the author and colleagues can have access. In the process, scientist A also signs away most, if not all, intellectual property rights and uses to his/her own work.

The long and short of it is that this model has become unsustainable for libraries whose budgets have not kept pace with the increasing costs of journal subscriptions and electronic access. For example, during the ten year period, 1993-2002, the price of journals increased 128.6%. Escalating costs of scientific journals, in particular, combined with a trend of decreasing library budgets, has resulted in severe cuts to research quality collections.

What is UW-Madison doing?

Just last spring, the University Library Committee unanimously passed a resolution in support of assisting university authors in managing their publishing rights and agreements. It was later taken up by the Faculty Senate on 7 May 2007 and approved as Faculty Document 1994. According to Ed Van Gemert, "the resolution supports the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) Provosts’ Statement on Publishing Agreements. [It] encourages the use of the addendum to publication agreements for CIC authors to ensure that academic authors retain certain intellectual property rights that facilitate archiving, instructional use, and sharing with colleagues to advance discourse and discovery."

The National Institutes of Health recently adopted a policy of open access whereby authors who are even partially funded by the NIH must submit all accepted, peer-reviewed manuscripts to the Institute's PubMed Central. These manuscripts will then by posted and made available to the public within 12 months of the publication date. The UW-Madison libraries have taken the lead in raising awareness on campus to the mandate and in providing practical solutions for compliance.

What can authors do?

  1. If you want to have the broadest possible sharing of your work, then it's important to understand why "controlling your copyright matters."
  2. Once you've decided to take an active part in managing your own copyright, it's necessary to consider the various options available, from signing away one's copyright as in the traditional model, to some rights retention, to retaining all rights, but authorizing the publisher to have certain licenses of distribution. Commendably, SSEC authors have traditionally published 85-87% of their papers with a professional society. But there is still lots of room to negotiate with publsihers about retaining control of intellectual property for the widest possible access.
  3. Where to start? You can begin to negotiate with publishers about retaining control of your intellectual property, even if you've traditionally published with societies or agencies.
  4. The Scholarly Publishing Office provides a good overview of the challenges authors and libraries face under the scholarly communication and publishing system status quo. It also features sample copyright transfer and publication agreements among other helpful resources.

We've compiled a list of the most commonly used professional societies and commercial publishers in the atmospheric and related sciences, with links to their various copyright policies, rules for posting articles to the author's Web site, along with titles of their journals. The chart below shows that most publishers fall into the traditional model where the author transfers copyright or where the author retains minimal rights. Few fall into the category whereby the author licenses the publisher to have certain distribution rights, but where the author retains copyright.

For comparison, we've followed with a list of open access journals in the atmospheric sciences, which typically use a creative commons type license.

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Copyright Policies
 

Option 1:
Traditional Model

Option 2:
Authors Retain
Some Rights

Option 3:
Authors Retain
All Rights

Option 4:
Open Access
Options

Commercial Publishers
       
 
X
   
     
X (standard pub fees + $2600)
 
X
   
   
X
 
X
     
     
X (standard pub fees + $3250)
X
 
X
 
X
     
         

Societies
or Agencies

       
   
X
 
 
X
   
 
X
   
X
     
X
     
 
X
   

 

Professional Societies or Agencies

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

American Geophysical Union (AGU)

American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE)

Optical Society of America (OSA)

 

Commercial Publishers

Blackwell Publishing

Elsevier

Nature Publishing Group

Springer

  • Copyright information including posting to author’s Web site:
  • Springer Open Choice – Authors may choose to have their Springer published journal articles designated as ‘open access’ (free to anyone, anytime, anywhere) in exchange for a fee of $3250, in addition to publishing fees
  • Journal(s): Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Climatic Change, Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters, Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, Pure and Applied Geophysics, Theoretical and Appliced Climatology

Taylor and Francis

Wiley Interscience

 

Open Access E-Journals
(for journals in other disciplines, see the Directory of Open Access Journals)

Atmosfera (1988-present)

  • ISSN: 0187-6236
  • Publisher: Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2001-present)

  • ISSN: 1680-7316
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (2001-present)

  • ISSN: 1680-7367
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (1970-present)

  • ISSN: 1520-0477
  • Publisher: Allen Press on behalf of the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Carbon Balance and Management (2006-present)

  • ISSN: 1750-0680
  • Publisher: BioMed Central

Climate of the Past (2005-present)

  • ISSN: 1814-9324
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Climate of the Past Discussions (2005-present)

  • ISSN: 1814-9340
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

The Cyrosphere (2007-present)

  • ISSN: 1994-0416
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

The Cryosphere Discussions (2007-present)

  • ISSN: 1994-0432
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

e-Earth (2006-present)

  • ISSN: 1815-381X
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (DGU)

e-Earth Discussions (2006-present)

  • ISSN: 1815-3836
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Electronic Journal of Severe Storms Meteorology (2006-present)

  • ISSN: 1559-5404
  • Publisher: E-Journals of Meteorology

Environmental Chemistry (2004-present)

  • ISSN: 1448-2517
  • Publisher: CSIRO Publishing

Geoscientific Model Development (new)

  • ISSN: 1991-959X
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Geoscientific Model Development Discussions (new)

  • ISSN: 1991-9611
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

History of Meteorology (2004-present)

  • ISSN: 1555-5763
  • Publisher: International Commission on History of Meteorology (ICHM)

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (1997-present)

  • ISSN: 1027-5606
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions (2004-present)

  • ISSN: 1812-2108
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2001-present)

  • ISSN: 1561-8633
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Ocean Science (2005-presenta)

  • ISSN: 1812-0784
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Ocean Science Discussions (2004-present)

  • ISSN: 1812-0806
  • Publisher: Copernicus GmbH on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

SOLA: Scientific Online Letters on the Atmosphere (2005-present)

  • ISSN: 1349-6476
  • Publisher: Meteorological Society of Japan

 

To read more about it:

Hirtle, Peter B. An examination of five alternatives. D-Lib Magazine, v.12, no.11, November 2006.

Tanner, R. Michael. Copyrights and the paradox of scholarly publishing. University of Illinois at Chicago, 2006.

Weller, Ann C. Electronic scientific information, open access, and editorial peer review: Changes on the horizon? Science & Technology Libraries, v.26, no.1, 2005.

 


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