Schwerdtfeger Library Hours

Monday - Friday 8:30am to 5:00pm
Alto-cumulus

Alto-cumulus
Credit: Hugo Hildebrand Hildebrandsson

Cuneiform tablet

Cuneiform tablet
Credit: Gavin Collins

Barometer

Barometer
Credit: Camille Flammarion

Cleveland Abbe

Cleveland Abbe
Credit: NOAA

Cumulo-nimbus

Cumulo-nimbus
Credit: Hugo Hildebrand Hildebrandsson

ENIAC

ENIAC
Credit: International Communication Agency

Richardson's 'forecast factory'

Richardson's 'forecast factory'
Credit: A. Lannerback

GOES-16 full-disk

GOES-16 full-disk
Credit: CIMSS/SSEC

Hygrometer

Hygrometer
Credit: James Smith

Meteorolo, title page

Meteorolo, title page
Aristotle

Morse telegraph

Morse telegraph
Credit: Alexander Roumega

Spin-scan cloud camera

Spin-scan cloud camera
Credit: NASA

U.S. Weather Bureau

U.S. Weather Bureau
Credit: Willis Milham

Radiosonde launch

Radiosonde launch
Credit: Harris & Ewing, Inc.

Roman anemoscope

Roman anemoscope
Credit: Walrasiad

Signal Service weather office

Signal Service weather office
Credit: Unknown

Thermoscope

Thermoscope
Credit: Unknown

TIROS

TIROS
Credit: NASA

First Doppler Radar

First Doppler Radar
Credit: U.S. Weather Bureau

New exhibit: A Brief History of Weather Forecasting

From the earliest days of civilization when meteorological events were predicted through optical phenomena, to the inventions of the Renaissance, to the 19th century establishment of a United States Weather Service, we have made tremendous strides in the science of weather forecasting. Technological advances in the last ninety years alone have served to increase warning times and improve and save lives across the globe. This exhibit is a brief look back at how far we have come.